Feedback: A Threat or an Opportunity. You Decide.

Feedback: A Threat or an Opportunity. You Decide.

If there’s one thing we’ve learned in the age of the Internet it’s this: people have opinions. Lots of them. Gone are the days of “Opinions are like assholes, everyone’s got one.” Today it seems like most people have several, and whether you wanted to see them or not, there they are all over your Twitter feed and in the YouTube comments section and maybe even landing directly in your inbox. But the truth is, as songwriters, we need other people’s opinions. See, songwriting is a social thing. Yes, most artists write for themselves and their tastes first – it’s pretty hard to create something great if you don’t like it – but they do it to share what they write for themselves first with the rest of us second. They build us a bridge to where they are. They let us in to who they are. And because your songs are not just about you, it’s important you have a way of finding out how your songs are landing with other people. That’s because, in short, no matter how good you are at songwriting there’s always a gap between the perfect work of art you imagined you’d create and the real-life work of art you actually did. (In fact, in a nutshell, becoming a better artist is learning to close this gap.) And that’s why being smart about reaching out for feedback as a songwriter is really important – whether you’re on your first song or your thousandth. You’re never going to see what you create the same way other people do, and having someone you trust to...
Write with Your Heart, Not Just Your Head: Why Songwriting Is About Much More Than Craft

Write with Your Heart, Not Just Your Head: Why Songwriting Is About Much More Than Craft

“Sex sells,” the saying goes. Well, it’s not as sexy, but songwriting craft sells too. It’s teachable. It’s concrete. It’s measurable enough that you can watch it improve. The trouble is, a song isn’t just the nuts and bolts that hold it together.  Just like a chair is more than a piece of wood or plastic – it’s what it adds to a space, it’s who sits on it, it’s who it brings together. If it sounds like I ripped that from IKEA’s latest ad campaign, then good. Because whether it’s design, visual art, songwriting or making YouTube videos, the most important thing that drives people is connection. A sense of love and belonging. And because that’s what drives people, that’s what drives the best marketers, business owners and, yes, artists, to do what they do. To find ways to connect with people. To find ways to make people feel something. The trouble with songwriting is that songwriting craft is the simplest and most concrete thing you can talk about. It’s easy, if you’re that way inclined, to tell people that their songwriting dreams aren’t coming true because their songs aren’t well crafted enough yet. And maybe, just maybe, that’s true. But it’s only half the picture. We want your song to be well crafted as much as we want a chair to rest flat on the floor and not fall apart. But we equally want your song to make us feel something. To show us part of you. To make us feel more connected and less alone and scared. Songs are written with the heart, not the head. The...
Five Ways to Become a Better Songwriter

Five Ways to Become a Better Songwriter

Getting good at songwriting takes time. Plenty of time. And plenty of practice. And while the Internet is full of people promising to make this process super easy for you, the simple truth is that 90% of your growth as a songwriter comes from you sitting in a quiet room and getting on with it. It’s true: the best thing about songwriting is that it can’t be taught, only learnt. In other words, the only way to become really good at it is to teach yourself how to be the best version of the artist you are already. Still, great songwriters don’t come from nowhere. They learn from the artists who came before them. They learn from the artists who are around them today. They learn from people who are the top of their game as well as people who are going through the same challenges they are right now. Let’s talk about five great ways to learn from other songwriters at all different kinds of levels.   Get to Know More Songs As Tom Lehrer once said, “Life is like a sewer. What you get out of it depends on what you put into it.” And that’s true of your songwriting brain too. In other words, your skill as a songwriter is directly proportional to the volume of songs you know, that you can draw from (i.e. steal from) in your own work. Because while there are plenty of places, like this website, where you can pick up songwriting techniques in theory, those techniques make a lot more sense when you see them in use first-hand in the songs...
I Am an Idiot (and So Are You)

I Am an Idiot (and So Are You)

I am an idiot. For every time I’ve known the answer, there are three when I didn’t. For every time I’ve asked a smart question, there are four when I had to ask a dumb one. For every time I’ve been confident in a decision I’ve made, there’s been seven when I had no idea what I was doing. I’ve made mistakes. I’ve made big mistakes. I’ve told myself I’m crazy, I’m stupid, I have no right to do that, say that or ask that out on a date. I’ve been told “No”, “Um, no”, “Hell no”, “NO, PLEASE DON’T ASK ME AGAIN”. And yet, I’m still here. I am an idiot, and yet I’m still here. I am an idiot, and yet I’ve learned so much. I am an idiot, and yet I’m weirdly cool with that. I have a masters degree, a successful online business, an international career as a songwriter, and yet I still think I am an idiot. I have done so much, and yet I still keep asking dumb questions and making mistakes and being told “Hell no”. Because I am an idiot. And because I always will be. And one thing I, an idiot, have learned along the way is that the trick to true confidence isn’t knowing all the answers and doing everything right and being comfortable with your successes. It’s being comfortable with not knowing the answers and making mistakes and having big failures once in a while. Because in this thing called “living a life worth living” those things are going to happen, to everyone. (Because yes, you are an...
Great Songs Aren’t Written, They’re Rewritten

Great Songs Aren’t Written, They’re Rewritten

Songs aren’t written, they’re rewritten. PRETTY MUCH EVERY SONGWRITER EVER It’s a cliché but it’s true. Lots of art that looks like it was easy to make was not easy to make. Lots of songs that sound like they came out in one go, perfectly formed did not come out in one go, perfectly formed. Songs aren’t written, they’re rewritten. “Sure” you’ll tell me. “But what about Paul McCartney writing the melody to ‘Yesterday’ instantaneously in a dream!? That song became the third most-performed song of the Twentieth Century SO HE MUST HAVE DONE SOMETHING RIGHT!!” And sure. It happens. Sometimes. (Especially when you’ve been writing songs for ten or twenty years.) But that’s not the full ‘Yesterday’ story: maybe the melody came to Paul McCartney in a dream, but the rest of the song didn’t come so fast. The first draft of the song had the dummy lyric: “Scrambled eggs, oh, my baby, how I love your legs…” (Seriously.) It took a lot of thinking before the snappy one-word title ‘Yesterday’ fell into place. Then it took a ton of persuading to convince McCartney that adding a string quartet to the song – it’d never been done before – was a good idea. And this is the ordinary, everyday reality for most songwriting: it often comes out slowly, and it often takes a ton of different tries to get right. This is what people call drafting. This is what people call rewriting. This is what some people call “HOW MANY TIMES DO I HAVE TO TRY WRITING THE SECOND VERSE BEFORE IT F**KING WORKS?!?”.     Because catchy half-truths aside –...


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